Tens, Romans & Lettermen – Part 2


Far be it from me to leave well enough alone. Let’s amp this discussion up to the next level. **

Part 2 – Advancing the Discussion

In Part 1 of this topic, we demonstrated why multi-tasking is bad for productivity. Some of you will be just fine with that conclusion. You probably are perfectly comfortable waiting for all three columns of the grid to be generated in sequence, and then just accepting the end result.

But what if there was a reason not to be so comfortable with that result? If that were the case, this discussion could get pretty interesting.

Note: If you haven’t read Part 1 yet, you should go back and do that first.

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Tens, Romans & Lettermen – Part 1

A simple game to illustrate the cost of task-switching *

The title of this post is a terrible play on words. Every time I think about it, I’m reminded of the opening lines of Mark Antony’s funeral oration. It’s cool if you don’t agree with the title. Lend me your ears anyway…

Multi-tasking via Task-Switching is a costly practice. This game can be used to illustrate this point with things you can probably find readily available in your desk or office-supply closet. The material is presented in 2 parts. Part 1 reveals the exercise in its most basic form. Part 2 expands on the original premise to learn even more…

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Having a Ball – Introduction

There is a simulation I build into my Agile training curriculum. It is based on a very old game that has been used for ages. I’m not the inventor of the game, but I am a very strong adapter of it. Here I examine the core game followed by variations I have used…

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